Your diagnosis

Basal cell carcinoma of the skin

This article will help you read and understand your pathology report for basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

by Allison Osmond, MD FRCPC
updated May 20, 2021

basal cell carcinoma

Quick facts:
  • Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer.
  • It is the most common type of cancer in adults.
  • Basal cell carcinoma affects older adults and it starts in sun-exposed skin.
Skin

Skin is made up of three layers: epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat. The surface and the part you can see when you look at your skin is called the epidermis. The cells that make up the epidermis include squamous cells, basal cells, melanocytes, Merkel cells, and cells of the immune system. The squamous cells in the epidermis produce a material called keratin which makes the skin waterproof and strong and protects us from toxins and injuries.

The dermis is directly below the epidermis. The dermis is separated from the epidermis by a thin layer of tissue called the basement membrane. The dermis contains blood vessels and nerves. Below the dermis is a layer of fat called subcutaneous adipose tissue.

What is basal cell carcinoma?

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma starts from the basal cells in the epidermis at the surface of the skin. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Most tumours occur in older adults on sun exposed skin. The tumour cells in basal cell carcinoma rarely spread to lymph nodes or distant sites such as the lungs.

How do pathologists make this diagnosis?

The diagnosis is usually made after a small tissue sample is removed in a procedure called a biopsy. The diagnosis can also be made after the entire tumour is removed in a procedure called an excision. If the diagnosis is made after a biopsy, your doctor will probably recommend a second surgical procedure to remove the rest of the tumour.

Types of basal cell carcinoma

There are different types of basal cell carcinoma based on how the cancer cells stick together and the shapes they form as the tumour grows. The type of basal cell carcinoma can only be determined after the tumour has been examined under a microscope by a pathologist.  A tumour may be made up of one or multiple types of basal cell carcinoma.

basal cell carcinoma

Types of basal cell carcinoma include:

  • Nodular
  • Superficial
  • Multifocal
  • Sclerosing
  • Basosquamous
  • Infiltrative
  • Micronodular

The sclerosing, basosquamous, and infiltrative types tend to grow deeper into the tissue below the epidermis and are more difficult to remove completely. As a result, they are associated with a higher risk that the tumour will re-grow after treatment.

What to look for in your report after the tumour has been removed

Tumour size

This is the size of the tumour measured in centimetres. Your report may only describe the greatest dimension. For example, if the tumour measures 5.0 cm by 3.2 cm by 1.1 cm, the report may describe the tumour size as 5.0 cm in the greatest dimension. The tumour size is only described after the entire tumour has been removed. Tumour size is not reported after a biopsy.

The tumour size is used to determine the tumour stage (see Pathologic stage below). Tumours that are larger than 2 centimetres are more likely to re-grow after treatment.

Depth of invasion

All basal cell carcinomas start in the epidermis on the outer surface of the skin. Depth of invasion describes how far the cancer cells have travelled from the epidermis into the tissue below. The movement of cancer cells from the epidermis into the tissue below is called invasion.

The depth of invasion is measured from the surface of the skin to the deepest point of invasion. Some pathology reports describe the depth of invasion as tumour thickness.

Tumours that invade deep into the dermis or subcutaneous adipose tissue are more likely to re-grow after treatment. The depth of invasion is also used to determine the tumour stage (see pathologic stage below). Tumours that grow into bone are associated with a worse prognosis.

Perineural invasion

Nerves are like long wires made up of groups of cells called neurons. Nerves send information (such as temperature, pressure, and pain) between your brain and your body. Perineural invasion means that cancer cells were seen attached to a nerve.

perineural invasion

Cancer cells that have attached to a nerve can use the nerve to travel into tissue outside of the original tumour. This increases the risk that the tumour will come back in the same area of the body (recurrence) after treatment. Tumours with basosquamous and sclerosing patterns of growth are more likely to show perineural invasion.

Lymphovascular invasion

Blood moves around the body through long thin tubes called blood vessels. Another type of fluid called lymph which contains waste and immune cells moves around the body through lymphatic channels.

lymphovascular invasion

Cancer cells can use blood vessels and lymphatics to travel away from the tumour to other parts of the body. The movement of cancer cells from the tumour to another part of the body is called metastasis. Before cancer cells can metastasize, they need to enter a blood vessel or lymphatic. This is called lymphovascular invasion.

Basal cell carcinoma only rarely shows lymphovascular invasion however when present it is associated with a higher risk that the cancer cells will spread to lymph nodes.

High risk features​

A high risk feature is something that makes the tumour more likely to come back in the future, either at the same location or to spread to a distant site such as the lungs. Cancer cells that spread to other parts of the body are called metastasis.

High risk features for basal cell carcinoma include:

Margins

A margin is a rim of normal tissue that surrounds a tumour and is removed with the tumour at the time of surgery. When examining a basal cell carcinoma under the microscope, a margin is considered positive when there is no distance between the cancer cells and the cut edge of the tissue.

Margin

Margins will only be described in your report after the entire tumour has been removed. Margins are not described after a biopsy.

A positive margin is associated with a higher risk that the tumour will re-grow in the same site after treatment. The micronodular and infiltrative patterns (see Patterns of growth above) are associated with a higher risk of a positive margin because there is no clear boundary between the edge of the tumour and the adjacent normal tissue.

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