breast

Sclerosing adenosis of the breast

What is sclerosing adenosis? Sclerosing adenosis is a non-cancerous growth made up of small glands in the breast. The glands are surrounded by a type of connective tissue that resembles a scar. When large enough, this type of growth can be seen in imaging studies such as mammography, and a biopsy may be performed to …
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Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH)

What is pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH)? Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a non-cancerous growth in the breast. It is made up of specialized cells called myofibroblasts. The growth is called “pseudoangiomatous” (which means “like blood vessels”) because the myofibroblasts form small slit-like spaces that look similar to blood vessels when examined under the microscope. What …
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Microcalcification

What is a microcalcification? A microcalcification is a small deposit of the mineral calcium inside tissue. Microcalcifications can be found anywhere in the body but they are most commonly found in the breast where they are associated with both non-cancerous and cancerous conditions. Imaging studies such as mammography can see microcalcifications in the breast and …
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Breast

What types of cells are normally found in the breast? Adult breast tissue is made up of small structures called glands which are organized into groups called lobules. Under certain conditions, these glands can produce milk, which is transported to the nipple by a series of small channels called ducts. The inside of both glands …
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Columnar cell hyperplasia

What is columnar cell hyperplasia in the breast? Columnar cell hyperplasia (CCH) is a non-cancerous condition in the breast. CCH starts in glands normally found in the breast and it can only be seen after tissue from the breast is examined under the microscope by a pathologist. CCC is usually seen with another non-cancerous change …
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Columnar cell change

What is columnar cell change in the breast? Columnar cell change (CCC) is a common non-cancerous condition in the breast. CCC starts in glands normally found in the breast and it can only be seen after tissue from the breast is examined under the microscope by a pathologist. CCC is usually seen with another non-cancerous …
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Breast cancer

What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a general term used to describe a group of malignant (cancerous) tumours that develop from cells normally found in the breast. A malignant tumour is made up of abnormal cells that have the ability to invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. The most …
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Fibrocystic change

What does fibrocystic change mean? Fibrocystic change (FCC) is a term used to describe a group of non-cancerous changes that often develop together in the breast. These changes include cysts, fibrosis, apocrine metaplasia, and adenosis. It is a common finding seen in up to 60% of reproductive-aged women. Another name for FCC is fibrocystic disease. …
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Flat epithelial atypia (FEA)

What is flat epithelial atypia (FEA)? Flat epithelial atypia (FEA) is a non-cancerous condition that develops in the breast. This change can only be seen after tissue from the breast is examined under the microscope by a pathologist. FEA is a common condition and it is often seen in breast tissue removed for another reason. …
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Phyllodes tumour

What is a phyllodes tumour? Phyllodes tumour is a rare type of breast tumour. Most phyllodes tumours will behave like non-cancerous tumours. However, a small number (approximately 10%) will behave like cancer. This behaviour includes the ability to spread through the normal tissue in the breast and to other parts of the body.  The entire …
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