definition

Fibromyxoid tumour

A “fibromyxoid tumour” is not a specific diagnosis but a descriptive term that refers to various benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous) tumours characterized by the presence of fibrous and myxoid tissue components. These tumours can arise in both soft tissues and bone throughout the body, and their behaviour depends on whether they are ultimately determined …
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Lymphoblasts

Lymphoblasts are immature cells that develop into lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that is integral to the immune system. They are part of the body’s adaptive immune response, responsible for fighting infections and providing long-term immunity. Where are lymphoblasts normally found? Lymphoblasts are primarily found in the bone marrow, the soft, spongy center …
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ECL (enterochromaffin-like) cell hyperplasia

ECL cell hyperplasia refers to an increase in the number of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells within the stomach lining. ECL cells are neuroendocrine cells that play an important role in the regulation of acid production in the stomach. Where are ECL (enterochromaffin-like) cells normally found, and what do they do? ECL cells are normally found in …
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Intranuclear inclusions

Intranuclear inclusions are abnormal collections of protein or other material found within the nucleus of a cell. These inclusions appear as rounded, compact masses that are often distinct from the surrounding nuclear material because of their colour, density, or composition. Medical conditions associated with intranuclear inclusions Intranuclear inclusions are associated with various medical conditions, the …
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Goblet cells

Goblet cells are large, round, mucin-filled cells found in the body’s mucous membranes. They are responsible for producing mucus. This secretion is a protective lubricant coating the lining of various organs, including parts of your digestive and respiratory systems. Where are goblet cells normally found? Goblet cells are typically located in the linings of your …
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Rhabdoid

In pathology, the term “rhabdoid” is used to describe tumour cells that resemble rhabdomyoblasts, which are immature skeletal muscle cells. However, these cells are not true rhabdomyoblasts and the tumours they arise in are not related to muscle tissue. Rhabdoid cells can be seen in a wide variety of tumour types and the presence of …
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Leukemia

Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are made. It is characterized by the rapid production of abnormal white blood cells (WBCs), which are not fully developed and do not function properly. These abnormal cells can accumulate in the blood and …
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Amorphous

In pathology, the term “amorphous” describes the appearance of material or tissue that lacks a defined shape or structure when viewed under a microscope. This term is used to characterize substances or cellular debris that do not have a recognizable cellular or tissue architecture, appearing as shapeless, unstructured masses. Amorphous material can be found in …
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Eosinophilic abscess

A collection of eosinophils inside tissue is called an eosinophilic abscess. Eosinophilic abscesses are often seen in areas of infection, especially infections caused by fungi or parasites. If the collection is large enough, it can form a sticky substance called pus. An eosinophilic microabscess is a small group of eosinophils inside tissue. Microabscesses can only …
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Macrophages

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell (WBC) that play an important role in the immune system, particularly in a process called phagocytosis, where they engulf and digest pathogens (viruses and bacteria), dead cells, and cellular debris. They start their life as monocytes, a type of blood cell, that migrate from the blood to …
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