dictionary

Well differentiated neuroendocrine tumour

What is a well differentiated neuroendocrine tumour? A well differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET) is a type of cancer made up of specialized neuroendocrine cells. The tumour is described as “well differentiated” because the cells in the tumour look very similar to normal, healthy neuroendocrine cells. These tumours can be found almost anywhere in the body. …
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Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma

What is a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma? Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma is a type of cancer made up of specialized neuroendocrine cells. Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma can be found almost anywhere in the body. The tumour is described as “poorly differentiated” because the cells in the tumour look very little like normal, healthy, neuroendocrine cells. …
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Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC)

What is a neuroendocrine carcinoma? Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is a type of cancer made up of specialized neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine carcinoma can be found almost anywhere in the body. Other names for this type of cancer are poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN). What are neuroendocrine cells? Neuroendocrine cells are a …
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Neuroendocrine tumour (NET)

What is a neuroendocrine tumour? A neuroendocrine tumour (NET) is a type of cancer made up of specialized neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine tumours can be found almost anywhere in the body. Another name for this type of cancer is neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN). What are neuroendocrine cells? Neuroendocrine cells are a specialized type of cell that are …
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Nuclear atypia

What does nuclear atypia mean? In pathology, nuclear atypia is used to describe nuclei that are abnormal in size, shape, or colour when examined under the microscope. The nucleus (the term nuclei is used to describe more than one) is the part of the cell that holds the genetic material or DNA. A group of …
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Low grade dysplasia

What is low grade dysplasia? Low grade dysplasia is an abnormal pattern of growth that can turn into cancer over time. This change is described as “low grade” because the abnormal cells look like normal, healthy cells when examined under the microscope. Does low grade dysplasia mean cancer? Low grade dysplasia does not mean cancer …
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High grade dysplasia

What does high grade dysplasia mean? High grade dysplasia is an abnormal pattern of growth that can turn into cancer over time. This change is described as “high grade” because the cells look very abnormal when examined under the microscope. Does high grade dysplasia mean cancer? High grade dysplasia does not mean cancer but if …
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Low grade

What does low grade mean? In pathology, low grade is used to describe cells that look abnormal when examined under the microscope but still share some features with normal, healthy cells. In order to determine if cells are low grade, pathologists often compare the abnormal-looking cells to the cells normally found in that part of …
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Cytologic atypia

What does cytologic atypia mean? Pathologists use the term cytologic atypia to describe cells that look abnormal when examined under a microscope. Cells may be described as showing cytologic atypia because of their shape, size, or colour. These changes can affect the cytoplasm (body) of the cell or the nucleus (the part of the cell …
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Pathology dictionary for patients

What is the pathology dictionary? The pathology dictionary is a collection of patient-friendly definitions for the most common terms and phrases used by pathologists in pathology reports. These definitions describe general concepts. Visit our Diagnosis Library to learn more about your diagnosis. Need help? Contact us. A B C D E F G H I J …
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