meaning

Peripheral nerve sheath tumour (PNST)

The term “peripheral nerve sheath tumour” (PNST) refers to a group of tumours that arise from the nerve sheath, which is the protective covering of the peripheral nerves. These nerves are the ones that extend outside the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) to the rest of the body. The nerve sheath is made …
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Blastoid

In pathology, the term “blastoid” refers to cells that have features resembling immature precursor cells, known as blasts, which are typically found in the bone marrow. These cells are generally considered abnormal and can be indicative of aggressive and rapidly proliferating diseases, often seen in certain types of cancers. Microscopic features of blastoid cells Blastoid …
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Blasts

In pathology, the term “blasts” refers to immature cells that are in the early stages of development into mature cells. These cells are typically found in the bone marrow, where they are part of the normal process of blood cell formation, known as hematopoiesis. Blasts can develop into various types of blood cells, such as …
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Cystic degeneration

Cystic degeneration refers to a process where tissue undergoes changes that result in the formation of fluid-filled structures called cysts. This change develops when the tissue starts to break down or degenerate for various reasons. Cystic degeneration can be caused by several factors, depending on the tissue or organ involved: Aging: As tissues age, they …
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Tumour bed

In pathology, the term tumour bed is used to describe an area of the body where a tumour was located before it was removed by surgery or treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy. It is important to examine the tumour bed because it can show how much of the tumour was killed by …
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Hepatocytes

What are hepatocytes? A hepatocyte is a type of cell that is found in the liver. What do hepatocytes do? Hepatocytes are very active and versatile cells that help to keep the body healthy and balanced. They are also able to regenerate when they are damaged or lost. The functions of a hepatocyte include: Making …
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Edematous

Edematous is a term used to describe the accumulation of clear, water-like fluid inside tissue. It is also called edema. A tissue becomes edematous when a specialized type of fluid called serum leaks out of blood vessels and into the surrounding tissue. Tissue can become edematous as a result of congestive heart failure, liver disease, …
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Plasmacytoid

In pathology, cells are described as plasmacytoid if they are round and if the nucleus (the part of the cell that holds the genetic material) is located to the side of the side. Pathologists often describe the location of the nucleus as eccentric or peripheral. These cells are described as plasmacytoid because they look like …
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BRAF

BRAF is a gene that provides instructions for making the BRAF protein, a kinase enzyme that is part of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In normal, healthy cells, this protein works with other proteins in the MAPK/ERK pathway to regulate cell growth and proliferation. However, a change in the BRAF gene can cause this protein to behave …
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Non-invasive

What does non-invasive mean in a pathology report? In pathology, non-invasive is used to describe a disease (typically a tumour) that remains localized and has not spread into the surrounding tissues or organs. All types of benign (noncancerous) tumours are by definition non-invasive. However, some types of early-stage malignant (cancerous) tumours are also considered non-invasive …
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