meaning

Edematous

What does edematous mean? Edematous is a term used to describe the accumulation of clear, water-like fluid inside the tissue. It is also called edema. What causes tissue to become edematous? A tissue becomes edematous when a specialized type of fluid called serum leaks out of blood vessels and into the surrounding tissue. Tissue can …
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Plasmacytoid cells

What are plasmacytoid cells? In pathology, cells are described as plasmacytoid if they are round and if the nucleus (the part of the cell that holds the genetic material) is located to the side of the side. Pathologists often describe the location of the nucleus as eccentric or peripheral. Why are they called plasmacytoid? These …
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BRAF

What is BRAF? BRAF is a gene that provides instructions for making the BRAF protein, a kinase enzyme that is part of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. This pathway plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and division. What is a gene? Each cell in your body contains a set of instructions that …
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Non-invasive

What does non-invasive mean in a pathology report? In pathology, non-invasive is used to describe a disease (typically a tumour) that remains localized and has not spread into the surrounding tissues or organs. All types of benign (noncancerous) tumours are by definition non-invasive. However, some types of early-stage malignant (cancerous) tumours are also considered non-invasive …
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Chromogranin

What is chromogranin? Chromogranin is a type of protein found primarily in neuroendocrine cells. There are three chromogranin proteins encoded by the CHGA (chromogranin A), CHGB (chromogranin B), and CHGC (chromogranin C) genes. What does chromogranin do? Chromogranins play important roles in the regulated secretion of hormones and specialized proteins called neuropeptides. They are present …
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Sebaceous glands

What are sebaceous glands? Sebaceous glands are a type of gland found in a part of the skin called the dermis. ¬†Sebaceous glands make and secrete a material called sebum which looks and feels like fat. Too much sebum can make our skin and hair feel greasy. Where are sebaceous glands normally found? Sebaceous glands …
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Basophils

What are basophils? Basophils are a type of white blood cell (WBC) that play a role in the body’s immune response. Basophils are similar in appearance to mast cells and are known for their large, dark-staining granules in the cytoplasm (body of the cell). Basophils are relatively rare, making up between 0.5% to 1.0% of …
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Antral type mucosa

What is antral type mucosa? Antral type mucosa is the thin layer of tissue that lines the antrum, cardia, and pylorus of the stomach. What types of cells are normally found in antral type mucosa? Antral type mucosa is made up of different types of cells that produce and secrete various substances, including mucus and …
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Fibrinopurulent exudate

What is fibrinopurulent exudate? Fibrinopurulent exudate is a type of fluid that accumulates at a site of tissue damage or inflammation, which contains a combination of fibrin, inflammatory cells such as neutrophils, and cellular debris. Fibrin is a protein that plays a role in blood clotting, and it can form a mesh-like network that helps …
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Squamous epithelium

What is squamous epithelium? Squamous epithelium is a thin layer of tissue made up of flat, squamous cells. The squamous epithelium forms a barrier on the surface of an organ that protects the tissue below from injury and infection. Where is squamous epithelium normally found in the body? Squamous epithelium can be found in various …
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