meaning

Fibromyxoid tumour

A “fibromyxoid tumour” is not a specific diagnosis but a descriptive term that refers to various benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous) tumours characterized by the presence of fibrous and myxoid tissue components. These tumours can arise in both soft tissues and bone throughout the body, and their behaviour depends on whether they are ultimately determined …
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Lymphoblasts

Lymphoblasts are immature cells that develop into lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that is integral to the immune system. They are part of the body’s adaptive immune response, responsible for fighting infections and providing long-term immunity. Where are lymphoblasts normally found? Lymphoblasts are primarily found in the bone marrow, the soft, spongy center …
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ECL (enterochromaffin-like) cell hyperplasia

ECL cell hyperplasia refers to an increase in the number of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells within the stomach lining. ECL cells are neuroendocrine cells that play an important role in the regulation of acid production in the stomach. Where are ECL (enterochromaffin-like) cells normally found, and what do they do? ECL cells are normally found in …
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Intranuclear inclusions

Intranuclear inclusions are abnormal collections of protein or other material found within the nucleus of a cell. These inclusions appear as rounded, compact masses that are often distinct from the surrounding nuclear material because of their colour, density, or composition. Medical conditions associated with intranuclear inclusions Intranuclear inclusions are associated with various medical conditions, the …
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Goblet cells

Goblet cells are large, round, mucin-filled cells found in the body’s mucous membranes. They are responsible for producing mucus. This secretion is a protective lubricant coating the lining of various organs, including parts of your digestive and respiratory systems. Where are goblet cells normally found? Goblet cells are typically located in the linings of your …
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Peripheral nerve sheath tumour (PNST)

The term “peripheral nerve sheath tumour” (PNST) refers to a group of tumours that arise from the nerve sheath, which is the protective covering of the peripheral nerves. These nerves are the ones that extend outside the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) to the rest of the body. The nerve sheath is made …
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Blastoid

In pathology, the term “blastoid” refers to cells that have features resembling immature precursor cells, known as blasts, which are typically found in the bone marrow. These cells are generally considered abnormal and can be indicative of aggressive and rapidly proliferating diseases, often seen in certain types of cancers. Microscopic features of blastoid cells Blastoid …
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Blasts

In pathology, the term “blasts” refers to immature cells that are in the early stages of development into mature cells. These cells are typically found in the bone marrow, where they are part of the normal process of blood cell formation, known as hematopoiesis. Blasts can develop into various types of blood cells, such as …
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Cystic degeneration

Cystic degeneration refers to a process where tissue undergoes changes that result in the formation of fluid-filled structures called cysts. This change develops when the tissue starts to break down or degenerate for various reasons. Cystic degeneration can be caused by several factors, depending on the tissue or organ involved: Aging: As tissues age, they …
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Tumour bed

In pathology, the term tumour bed describes an area of the body where a tumour was located before it was removed by surgery or treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy. It is important to examine the tumour bed because it can show how much of the tumour was killed by the treatment and …
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